Lectures

Predeterministic philosophy of the body:

Asclepius to DNA (4 Hours)

This four hour lecture discusses the changes in the philosophy of the body from ancient Greece to the modern DNA manipulation. The common thread of this discussion is from the perspective of predeterminism and determinism which became a critical part of medical practice early on and how it resurges with each major advancement, even today. We will look at how our concept of self has changed and look at the instigators for these changes. Final analysis of the dangers we face in our medical future. Are we at risk of a Eugenics revolution? How much control do we require over our own evolution, and what needs are we addressing with species-alteration? We will look at how culture has reacted to medical breakthroughs throughout the last 2500 years as a way to determine our likely progress in the near and distant future, from farming and genetic engineering to prosthetics, laboratory grown organs and designer children.

30.00 a student
minimum of 10 students, no maximum
Institution flat rate discounts available.

Medical practice and physical examination:

3 thousand years in 3 hours (3 Hours)

This lecture/discussion serves as a crash course in the history of anatomy and physiology from the priests of Imhotep to contemporary surgical practice and teaching. The focus of the course is not simply factual, but brings to light 4 major components of medical science as seen through a anthropological lens. Cosmology, Ethics, Discovery, and Practice. At the close of the course, I will be available for an additional hour for questions and topical discussion.

20.00 a student
minimum of 10 students, no maximum
Institution flat rate discounts available.

Dissection and its influence on Art:

Renaissance to Post Modern (3 Hours)

In 1299 Pope Boniface VIII issued a papal bull entitled De Sepolturis which clumsily forbade the usage of human corpses for dissection. However, having understood the devastating consequences, subsequent popes evolved the issue resulting in a dramatic full reversal. This lecture delves into the details of this issue during the 300 years that followed De Sepolturis, the cultural landscape as well as the circumstances that formed it. We will then explore the wider scope of impact throughout the renaissance and following eras including the anatomical wax schools, key medical illustrators, and other anatomically influenced artists. We will end at our current period with discussions on the works of scientist/artists like Gunther von Hagens.

20.00 a student
minimum of 10 students, no maximum
Institution flat rate discounts available.

Dissection and ethics (3 Hours)

Traveling down a different road than Human Anatomy, Dissection and its influence on Art, this course follows the same timeline but chooses a different path for its focus. We will explore some of the more complex issues of ethics and look into the wild passion that we as a species posses that can sometimes become blinded by potential. We will look at everything from the usage of Crusader soldiers bodies in the 1200’s to Chinese prisoners in our own time.

20.00 a student
minimum of 10 students, no maximum
Institution flat rate discounts available
The above two lectures can be combined
Please contact jeremyjohnson888@gmail.com for details.

All lectures, presentations, and dissections are heavily reliant on audience participation. These are not the same sorts of lectures you may have experienced before. I believe in a model that requires direct input and investment of the participants in order to foster an environment focused on making connections and discovery. I choose to switch my role from presenter to moderator depending on the discussions at hand, which means that participants have a heavy influence on the direction of each lecture. Debates arise, and sometimes even a few arguments erupt. This is not to say that the structure is unorganized, chaotic and without concrete information, however there is always time built in to each presentation for a few rabbit holes. By the end, you will not go home with a notebook full of names, dates, and terms from the topics; but hopefully the names and contact details of those who you would like to continue a conversation with over coffee (or a cat).